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17

The formatting is MathJax and is pretty useful for complex math. If you want to use a normal dollar sign you have to "escape" the symbol. This means that you tell the interpreter "You know, the following is just a normal character. Not some formatting stuff like 'I want this italic', or 'I want this bold' or 'I want this in fancy math-whatever style'". To ...


16

The LateX code required to give a particular output can be learned from a variety of sources, from the TeX stack exchange site to mathurl.com where you can piece together an expression and then see what code produces it. This and this are also good dictionaries for LaTeX. You can also click "edit" below any question or answer you'd like to emulate, and see ...


11

I don't have any such edit to look at immediately, so I'm going from memory here. Please excuse any inaccuracies. There are different "views" of posts in the review queues. Particularly, there is a source view and a "rendered" view. These are good at different things, but one thing the "rendered" view is decidedly better at is showing Mathjax. Whenever ...


7

L.Dutch already told you to use curly braces ({}) around the number. So you'd write x^{15} to get $x^{15}$. This applies more generally as well. For example, \sqrt xy will render as $$\sqrt xy$$ but \sqrt{xy} renders as $$\sqrt{xy}$$ and correspondingly \sqrt \sin xy gives you $$\sqrt \sin xy$$ which is probably not what you meant, while \sqrt{\sin{xy}} ...


5

Use {...} to input more than 1 character. $3^{15}$ will be given by 3^{15}


2

Use \text{}. This MathJaX code: 1 \times 10^{23} kg produces this output: $ 1 \times 10^{23} kg $ By wrapping the kg in \text{ }, we get: 1 \times 10^{23} \text{ kg} which produces $ 1 \times 10^{23} \text{ kg} $


1

sandbox Other answers are for sandbox experimentation and discussion. The only way to see what we’re doing is in a post. It doesn’t look the same in comments or a chat room. vector with subscript name What’s the right way to indicate a vector quantity with subscriped name, like p_in for momentum? HDE 226868 suggests Would something like $\vec{p_{\text{...


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