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How fast can a plasma projectile move before it begins to fuse with the surrounding atmosphere?

Closing something as unclear is one thing, but not writing there how it's unclear is an act, which should be punished by BANHAMMER.

So why was this question put on hold as unclear?

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    $\begingroup$ Please maintain appropriate language for this venue. Yiu are in danger of having your question redacted, which doesn't help if it's a serious question. Please edit the wording ASAP. $\endgroup$
    – JDługosz
    Jun 11, 2017 at 8:51

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Revision #4 is what was put on hold. Take another look at that question.

Note, in particular, these comments:

You wouldn't be able to create such high velocities in non vacuum conditions. – sphennings (link)

If your question requires watching two videos, reading one linked external article and googling for second one, then it is a bad question. Both questions and answers are supposed to be as self-contained as possible. – Mołot (link)

I agree with Molot's comment. I didn't watch the videos and read the links, and I couldn't tell what you were trying to ask. It had four close votes when I saw that, so I cast the fifth.

There's also the gratuitous Hitler stuff, which as I noted was attracting flags.

You've now edited the question to focus it more, which is good. I see it has one reopen vote already. If it's now clear to the people who know more physics than I do, it should gather more such votes.

That is, assuming people aren't turned off by the attitude displayed in your meta post, especially the first version. It's ok to disagree with other users and good to seek clarification when you're confused about why something happened, but you'll always get better results if you approach it in the spirit of cooperation and with a little humility.

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    $\begingroup$ Thank you. Redacted asks here about "not writing there how it's unclear", and I appreciate that you noticed I actually wrote. $\endgroup$
    – Mołot
    Jun 12, 2017 at 15:07
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Well, the fact that you have to point out “the bold part was tbe question” in a postscript doesn’t help.

We need data on how fast a shot of ionized air can be without becoming an unstable fusion when enters the atmosphere (the gun's interior is in a vacuum) and blows up the neighborhood.

How fast can a shot be before… what? I for one don’t understand what you concern is here, and whether it’s real or a cartoon-physics thing that wouldn’t really happen.

There is only one reason shown when closing, and it's not always clear if the reasons don’t explain the actual issues clearly and more than one is used by different voters. I ran into this myself in the early days, seemingly having contradictory issues at once.

Here, you can read the various comments that have been left on the post. It was flagged as rude and offensive as well.

You might not realize that mentions of Hitler are rude and provocative, if not profane, in many cultures. And there is no real reason to bring it up! You seem to be referring to elements from your story scenario rather than abstracting the idea out of any specific story.

Look at the structure of your post: the Title is properly to the point, but it's unclear what you meant by fuse with the atmosphere. Does that mean the gas making up the shot is mixed and no longer holds its integrety, or are you referring to nuclear fusion?

Then in the body of the post you don’t start with a synopsis. You give a bottom-up explaination which we don’t follow before getting to the question which is not written as an interrogative sentence and needs to be pointed out again as noted above. We still don’t know what you're asking, and the pos, while brief, is mostly things we can't follow.

Hasn't speed of a vortex ring been asked before, recently? You already know that toroidal vortexes can’t move very fast.

Here I posted a question to gather some more basic information on the subject. How fast can they go? period — a real-world physics question with no story involved at all.

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