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To ask question at worldbuilding, I need to describe my story.

Can somebody steal it? Or it's protected by copyright?

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    $\begingroup$ Try focusing only on the question you need to ask and only provide the information needed for that question. This will reduce your worry on that front and also make it more likely that people will read the full question and answer. $\endgroup$
    – Tim B
    Apr 21 '17 at 15:59
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not a lawyer but ideas aren't copyrightable anyway. A good worldbuilding question shouldn't be about your story. If you need to describe your story than it isn't a good question for this site. $\endgroup$
    – sphennings
    Apr 21 '17 at 18:12
  • $\begingroup$ Well i think that you and we all are at risk of this problem,But if people spends their time and energy to write great answers,Sometimes better than the question...I think its a bit fair...Not totally sure but just think...Who help for free nowadays? $\endgroup$ Apr 22 '17 at 3:06
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Everything you publish on Stack Exchange is published under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ - so anything you publish can be used by others as long as they attribute it to you properly.

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

You in this quote means anything who reads your posts.

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    $\begingroup$ Note that the license only applies to the literal content posted. So if I copy a few paragraphs from a question or an answer, then I have to abide by the license. However, if I read a post, then go on to do something of my own with the ideas expressed therein, without using the literal content that was posted and which I read, then CC-BY-SA does not enter into the picture for me. IANAL, so take this as being worth exactly what you paid me for it in advance. $\endgroup$
    – user
    May 4 '17 at 21:20
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There are two factors here, copyright and licensing.

Unless you live in one of the few places in the world that hasn't signed the treaty, you own the copyright on your work upon creation, including posting it here. If somebody takes your exact words and publishes them under his own name, that's a copyright infringement.

However, by posting on Stack Exchange you grant everybody a license to use your work, as explained in this answer. It's still your work, but other people can use it too -- in the exact form you posted it or with alterations. You can't prevent them, but they have to give you credit. (They also have to grant the same license for their version of the work.)

All that said, sharing ideas usually isn't that risky. Lots of people have lots of ideas; where the work and copyright concerns really come into play is when you develop those ideas into a tangible work like a short story, novel, game, or video. I wouldn't recommend posting those works here if you hope to profit from them later, but it's usually not appropriate to post such works as questions or answers here anyway, so this shouldn't be much of a problem.

Obligatory disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. Read the terms of the license agreement.

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    $\begingroup$ That would be the Berne convention on copyright. $\endgroup$
    – user
    May 4 '17 at 21:11
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I’ve taken to posting/hosting the story on my own site first, and then quote and cite from it on WB.

Quoting from an unpublished work, noting that it is from a copyrighted work, has drawn comments about what’s posted on WB is under creative commons with accusations that I’m trying to modify that.

But WB doesn’t try to re-licence things used with permission — so avoid the hassle and post on a site you control first.

As for general ideas that you want to discuss but have not written a story using, yet: that falls squarly under the creative commons content posted on WB.

Such general ideas are not something you can defend. An entire plot complete with character info (e.g. cloning Star Wars rather than writing yet another Hero's Journey space opera) would not be posted here — that’s too “story based” or too much specific detail that’s irrelevant to the question.

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    $\begingroup$ "But WB doesn’t try to re-licence things used with permission" - any legal reference about that? $\endgroup$
    – Mołot
    Apr 21 '17 at 19:59
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    $\begingroup$ stackexchange.com/legal You agree that all Subscriber Content that You contribute /.../ is /.../ licensed to Stack Exchange under the /CC-BY-SA/ license. You grant Stack Exchange the /.../ right and license to use, copy, cache, publish, display, distribute, modify, create derivative works and store such Subscriber Content and, except as otherwise set forth herein, to allow others to do so in any medium now known or hereinafter developed (“Content License”) in order to provide the Services, even if such Subscriber Content has been contributed and subsequently removed by You. $\endgroup$
    – user
    May 4 '17 at 21:14
  • $\begingroup$ I had to make judicous use of the delete key on my keyboard to make the most relevant part fit inside the space allowed for by a comment. See the terms of service for the actual version. $\endgroup$
    – user
    May 4 '17 at 21:14

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