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We are starting to have a problem with questions. While the impact of events on a culture is part of Worldbuilding, you could easily write a thesis on even the smallest change and how it permeates through society.

Thus I have two requests:

Feature
Can we get a warning tag for like stack overflow does if you tag java and javascript? Something that says how broad a field it is an that you need to focus on a narrow aspect?

Policy
Questions that ask about are required to have narrow scope. When you ask about psychology, ask about a very specific aspect. Questions that say "Could this change to cause this?" are good. Questions that say "If {something happens} how would the world react?" are clearly bad.

As an aside, we need to start enforcing our back it up policy with these questions a lot more strictly.

(As usual with these kinds of posts. Upvote for agreement, downvote for disagreement, answers for responses and considerations)

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  • $\begingroup$ It may also be worth considering whether such a question might be a better fit on Psychology & Neuroscience instead. Just because a question can be shoehorned into being about worldbuilding, doesn't necessarily mean that a worldbuilding expert is going to be the best at answering that particular question. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Nov 3 '14 at 10:52
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    $\begingroup$ We don't have Writers as a default migration target choice. Generally speaking, it takes a fair bit to add default migration targets. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Nov 3 '14 at 12:27
  • $\begingroup$ (Like, site graduation from beta. Both Writing and Psychology & Neuroscience are still in beta, as are we, obviously.) $\endgroup$ – a CVn Nov 3 '14 at 13:08
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A comment with regards to the above that you can agree or disagree with separately.

A question that talks about psychology changes should include what you think would happen. This narrows the scope as answers focus on what you think would happen, and if others believe it would or would not happen that way. It also shows that you have put some thought into the question.

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