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This question seems to be too broad. As Michael Kjörling noted in the comments though (emphasis mine):

[...] For the specific case, I'm tempted to agree that it is very broad, but also (at a glance) think that the answers saved the question which makes me unwilling to close it by mod hammer. (And, of course, it already has an accepted answer.)

So here's the question, what should be done when a question on its own merit should be closed but has received good answers?

I'm inclined to say the question should be edited as much as possible to be a better fit for our site while trying to avoid making the answers (completely) invalid. This is in line with stack exchange's goal to create a mass of excellent answers to well asked questions.

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    $\begingroup$ Remember that nothing happens to the answers when a question is put on hold or closed. Closure simply means that no new answers can be added. High-quality content remains. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Oct 30 '14 at 8:13
  • $\begingroup$ Low-quality questions are deleted automatically, and both moderators and high-reputation users can delete questions by vote (moderators have a binding vote). See Enable automatic deletion of old, unanswered zero-score questions after a year? and How does deleting work? What can cause a post to be deleted, and what does that actually mean? What are the criteria for deletion?. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Oct 30 '14 at 8:19
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    $\begingroup$ Just to note that when poor questions attract great answers, we've added three new badges to encourage those authors to also edit those ill-fit questions so people can actually find them: Editing is essential $\endgroup$ – Robert Cartaino Oct 30 '14 at 13:30
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    $\begingroup$ For the record I do plan to edit that question, just haven't had time. $\endgroup$ – James Oct 30 '14 at 13:45
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    $\begingroup$ For those who are relative newcomers to the site, since this was bumped by a new answer, I just want to point out that at the time I posted the comment quoted in the question, I held a moderator diamond. Note the qualifier that I was unwilling to close unilaterally, "by mod hammer". That doesn't mean I felt that the question was good; rather that I felt it wasn't sufficiently bad for me to hammer it shut without the community having much of a say. I have discussed this elsewhere on WB Meta, but my general opinion was and is that closing by mod hammer should be reserved for obvious cases. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Aug 21 '17 at 9:11
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We close the question, the answers remain for anyone who views or finds the question but no more can be added. The question has up votes and high quality answers so will not be automatically deleted.

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    $\begingroup$ Having you as a mod is going to make owning Reversal rather impressive :P $\endgroup$ – Black Nov 2 '14 at 0:00
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    $\begingroup$ @Black you can still vote on closed questions, so it's still fairly possible. $\endgroup$ – DonyorM Nov 7 '14 at 3:04
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Here's a suggestion I'm not sure about: aggressively edit the question. If a question with a good answer cannot be edited to be at least good enough to re-open, I would argue that nobody's really tried. In the special case of questions that are closed as overbroad and yet have good answers, to me this indicates a failure of motivation on the part of the close-voters. If someone else did the work that you had thought excessive, it begins to look like you're merely enforcing your own level of slothfulness and lack of imagination.

I understand that there are regular efforts to rescue closed questions, but perhaps we should seek a way to further incentivize this behavior, like maybe a larger reputation bonus for editing closed questions upon reopening. Is that even possible?

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    $\begingroup$ Edits are supposed to preserve the authors intention. "Aggressively edit[ing]" a question is not what we are supposed to do. It's the authors job and his right to keep the intent as it is. If you aggressively change the question than it's not likely to be closed as a duplicate and you should post it yourself. $\endgroup$ – Secespitus Aug 20 '17 at 17:59
  • $\begingroup$ You may be interpretting me too strongly. If you edit a question with a good answer so aggressively that the asker's intent is obliterated, it seems that the connection between the (new) question and the answer will have been severely disrupted, obliterating the value of the answer. $\endgroup$ – SudoSedWinifred Aug 20 '17 at 18:05
  • $\begingroup$ "Aggressive" is a pretty strong word. While I am not a native speaker and am therefore always open for corrections I think this word makes pretty clear that your intent is to aggressively/ dramatically/ substantially change the question. This seems to be more than the formatting, grammar fixes and similar things that edits are supposed to do. I fail to see how anyone could aggressively change the text of someone else while preserving his intentions. Adding points to the question, focussing on other or certain aspects and similar things are for the OP to decide - not for the community. $\endgroup$ – Secespitus Aug 20 '17 at 18:14
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    $\begingroup$ When reviewing edits of questions by low rep users one of the reasons for rejection is edits that conflict with authorial intent. Aggressively editing the question makes it easy to conflict with the intent of the OP. This also runs the risk of invalidating other answers to the question. $\endgroup$ – sphennings Aug 20 '17 at 20:56
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    $\begingroup$ Furthermore it perverts the process of voting on questions to rewrite the question to fit the answer. That's like drawing the target once the shots have been fired. $\endgroup$ – sphennings Aug 20 '17 at 20:57
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    $\begingroup$ What will happen if you do this is that the next person to come along will roll back the edits. Major changes to posts are for the post owner to make and only the post owner. Spelling, grammar, formatting etc, yes absolutely, but don't touch the meaning of the content. $\endgroup$ – Separatrix Aug 21 '17 at 10:27

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