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Yesterday, I came across an answer from a new user that caught my attention not because of its quality (or lack thereof), but because it consisted of 15 questions to the OP and 1 suggestion.

I suggested the user take those questions to chat, discuss them with the OP, and provide an answer. I also flagged the question as not-an-answer. Apparently, however, the community consensus is that an answer comprised of questions to the OP is a perfectly valid answer.

For formal reference, what position and action should we take concerning answers that contain more requests for clarification from the OP than statements that provide a solution to the question? Alternatively, do a long series of requests for clarification provide a solution to a question?

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In this case, I don't think it's as much requests for clarification as it is rhetorical questions. Sure, if the OP had provided answers to the questions beforehand, then maybe it would be easier to give a straightforward answer. But I'm in support of giving general answers to things, and in this case a list of questions can provide a framework by which users can make their own informed decisions about their world. In essence, since the OP didn't provide a specific problem, the answerer provided a general solution. And, honestly, it might be better that way. If we can have one question that's easy to find with an answer that will solve most similar problems, I think it's better than having a dozen questions with strange specific titles and problems each with a specific solution that might only help one person.

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The problem isn't the answer, it's the question

In that particular case, if that many clarification questions are warranted to get a usable question, then the question itself is too broad and should be closed (as that one was).

The answer cited is commentary on a question, not an answer itself. If the question were better, I'd encourage the poster to improve their answer, else vote to delete.

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