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How would existence of a stun gun affect Worldbuilding Meta? Look, I am not against that idea specifically, I just feel it is too much of asking for one specific topic, which is not amusing for me.

Questions asked so far:

I know there are also Fortnightly challenges (and I did not find the Moons one amusing either), but what I am basically trying to say:

How much should you go into your big idea and ask about specific aspect of such idea?

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There is nothing inherently wrong with what is being done.

That said I see a few issues.

Odds are people aren't going to respond to three question on the same topic...nor even necessarily read them all.

My personal method is to space them out. I asked a series of ...I think it was three questions on religion, I waited until each was answered and accepted before starting up another one and even then I think I gave it two or three days before I did my follow up.

Couple reasons I go this route.

  • I want the focus on one of my questions, not 2, not 3...etc. The focus hypothetically gets me more and better answers.
  • Its less for me to keep up with (comments, clarification, etc)
  • If you screw up the premise on one question (which can be clear after comments from people) you now have to clean up three or however many questions as opposed to 1.
  • It doesn't annoy pavel. I say this seriously though I am just using you as an example. Frankly when I see any more than two questions from a single person on the top of the new list I feel like it is spam...it may be three well thought out questions but posting them all at once somehow diminishes the perceived value of each.
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  • $\begingroup$ Totally pinpoints my mindset. I also had series of questions about a topic, but acted like you. Tempted to ask Meta question "how many questions for given topic should you ask in one day" :) $\endgroup$ Oct 19 '15 at 18:53
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    $\begingroup$ @PavelJanicek I don't know that we can set that number...if someone wants to ask 8 questions in one day we can't stop them. Now, odds are the majority of the questions are terrible questions so that gets easy to downvote and close...two max on a single topic on a single day is my general maximum rule of thumb. $\endgroup$
    – James
    Oct 19 '15 at 18:55
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    $\begingroup$ For an example of how asking a series of questions (rather than a batch) worked out well and allowed them to build on each other, see this post on the Worldbuilding blog. $\endgroup$ Oct 19 '15 at 19:23
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What bugged me (a little) about those questions was their temporal proximity to each other in posting. Three questions all on the same day about the same idea seems a bit excessive, though if spread out over a few days I wouldn't have minded.

I've noticed other OPs post questions over the course of days or weeks where I can watch the development of their world. @rumguf had a fantastic (though very hard to answer) set of questions about alternate biochemistry systems. I couldn't answer any of them but they were really fun to read.

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In my personal opinion, asking a lot of questions revolving around a single topic is definitely better than slapping your topic down on the table and taping a question mark to the end of it. Rather than asking one question that's too broad, series questions seek to split up their general lack of knowledge into manageable chunks that can more easily be digested by answerers. I think this is a good thing.

One problem that I've often noticed, though, is that the answer to most of these questions depends on the answers to the other ones. In your example, you can't really say how the police would be trained to fight stun-gun-using bad guys until you know what laws are in place for the use of stun guns. Likewise, it might be difficult to say what laws would be put in place for stun guns without knowing how the police could respond to them. In situations such as this, I find myself in an answerer deadlock, and can't focus on one question without focusing on the others. For this reason, not only have we gone back to the initial too broad problem, but now no one can even provide a good answer without splitting it into separate pieces or copying it into the other questions.

I don't even think the temporal distance between questions is of any use here, because asking one question while leaving the other for the next day might mean that that second question ends up getting answered in order to answer the first. Thus, either you see both questions and can't answer either, or you only see the first and end up answering all of them by accident.

For this reason, I'd say there are still cases where asking a series of questions is just fine, but that you can't always split up a broad question and expect it to be improved. That hunting question looks like it could stand on its own to me, but the law and police questions are just too closely coupled to be split up.

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