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I had a question here https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/q/250438/106249 and it said it is getting reviewed how do I know if its been done. Also what did I do wrong in this question.

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  • $\begingroup$ I wanted to say since you told you were nervous : It's OK, there are a lot of people who make a lot questions much, much worse than yours. Yours has worldbuilding context (some don't even have any) and it was pretty clear. You just got unfortunate that it fell just right in a specific kind of questions which is not accepted here 😊. $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 12, 2023 at 13:56
  • $\begingroup$ If you wish a less stress-inducing experience, the sandbox Sphenning suggested is a good place. It's made to keep judgement to a minimum : No downvote, no closure, only here to help you write a good question... $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 12, 2023 at 13:59

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This site is different from other Q&A sites. If you read through our [tour] you'll see that not every worldbuilding question is suitable for this site. Our goal is to build a library of detailed answers to every question about worldbuilding. Certain worldbuilding questions aren't conducive to the creation of such a library.

Not all questions work well in our format. Avoid questions that are primarily opinion-based, or that are likely to generate discussion rather than answers.

Don't ask about...

  • Anything not directly related to worldbuilding
  • Questions that are primarily opinion-based
  • Questions with too many possible answers or that would require an extremely long answer

When a question is edited it automatically gets entered into a review queue moderators and members who have earned the reopen votes have access to this queue. If a mod or 5 voting members deem that in it's current form the question is suitable for this site it will be reopened. You can see the progress (or lack) of the review process by looking under your question, to the left and below the tags. There are several links: Share | Edit | Follow | Reopen (x) | Flag. Reopen (x) indicates how many members have voted to reopen your query as is.

Your question has been deemed likely to have many equally valid answers based in opinion rather than facts. Whether you believe humans are a fearful species or not there's a wonderfully large and diverse range of things that we can value. It's unclear how being fearful would impact this. Given the nature of the core of your question you'll likely need to make fundamental changes to it before it could get reopened.

The best way to do this is to start by identifying your reason for asking the question. Then construct the simplest single sentence version of the question. If this core ask is suitable for this site (What should I ask?, What is off-topic?) then flesh it out with the necessary details and clarifying information to enable askers to provide helpful answers.

In the future you may want to take advantage of the sandbox to get feedback and help improving questions before posting them.

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Adding some specifics

I up voted @Sphennings' answer. It's excellent and I hope you carefully read it. I wanted to point out a specific issue about ambiguity. You asked:

I'm wondering what kind of things they value and would see as a virtue.

We have no idea why that question is important. As a result, it's ambiguous. The answer could credibly by anything (too broad, not focused). Worse, it could be a choice.

Value and virtue are matters of choice. Even when it's a need, it's a choice to give it value. For example, a desert-dwelling people would value water, but that suggests it's something worth trading for, something worth fighting a war for... that's different than a lizard (which can't make as many choices, if any) simply needing water to survive.

The Help Center states:

If ... you aren’t sure what a character (be it an individual or organization) should do, that is out of scope for the site.

And that's the problem with values and virtues — they're choices. What makes water more valuable to a desert-dwelling people than (e.g.) metal? In fact, it may not be more valuable than metal. It's those differences, the judgement of something being more valuable and something being less valuable that falls over the line. Whether discussing an individual, a society, or a species, you've asked us to tell you what they would choose, and because that can literally be anything, it becomes opinion-based and out of scope (off-topic).

Remember, the Help Center says we're here to help you build your world, not tell your story. Separating the story from the worldbuilding question requires practice. When asking any question here, it's important to ask yourself "why am I asking this question?" before striking the Submit button. If the answer is, "I need it for my story," then you're almost guaranteed to have the question closed. If the answer is (e.g.), "because I'm trying to achieve effect X in my story and I believe it should be a basic attribute of my creatures," then you need to explain what X is and why you need it in your post.

As written, your post appears to be looking for attributes that are no different than what color the fur should be, how long the horns should be, and other purely aesthetic choices that have everything to do with the story, but little or nothing to do with the world.

Remember, ask us for help solving a problem. A list of values might solve a problem, but you didn't explain a problem that would be solved with a value or virtue.

Infinite vs. Finite

Finally, one more thing. You'll notice in the Help Center that we discourage brainstorming. In fact, the Help Center prohibits open-ended questions and questions that lead to all answers having equal value. As written, you're asking for an off-topic infinite list of things. In other words, the list could be anything with no expected, specific, and focused reason for one being better than another.

We do permit questions that result in a finite list of things. Note that I say "result." You're still expected to ask a fundamentally objective question with the expectation of selecting a single best answer. "How can I change the human arm to allow it to lift 200 pounds easily?" may result in 3-5 different things that must change to permit the one, specific expectation, but the question is still asking for just one thing, not a list of things.

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